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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 139 (some duplicates have been removed)
by the federal government, and they are challenging the law that allows this because they are concerned their communications will be picked up. up, and in the course of that surveillance, they have the right to challenge that in court. that is the standing issue. to get to the merits, fisa passed in 1978, and in the aftermath about abuses, it set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purposes. this is a way of making sure the court -- it had a check and a role in reviewing the efforts to do this wiretapping, which had designed in 1978 is congressthe problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications -- surveillance required court approval. the statute referred to the technology at the time, those communications that were wired, radioed, or satellite technology. since 1978 we have seen a dramatic change of the technology of communications, particularly fiber optic cable, which has changed the court they try to get this case in electronic surveillance. the r
in a critical battle ground state. >>> a judge blocking part of pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. law. opponents said the law was aimed at stopping minorities and the elderly from casting ballots. >> my sense is that the republicans did this to beat obama. >> supporters argued it was hadn't to stop fraud. >> no one will be disenfranchised by the fraud. >> tonight what this decision means for the presidential election. >>> plus, trouble in the seats. seats coming loose on american airlines jets. >> my son's seat was kind of like almost falling off. we were trying to push it in and hold it in. >> i think the faa needs to look at this incident. >> now planes grounded and serious questions about safety. >>> and when this ball player stepped to the plate for the first time in the majors, a wild pitch knocked him down. >> i didn't get out away enough and it caught up under my helmet. >> now seven years later, one team is giving him another chance. tonight adam greenberg back in the big leagues. i'm bill hemmer in for shepard smith. one of the toughest voter i.d. laws in the country cannot t
begins anew on "studio b" today. the verdict is in. after challenges to a controversial voting law in the key battleground state of pennsylvania forcing everyone to show a photo i.d. before casting a ballot. we will tell you if the law will stand. >> we are a day away from the first of three presidential debates. ahead is a look at the issues that will be front and center for president obama and governor romney. >> plus, one of the biggest u.s. airlines reports more problems involving loose seats forcing emergency landing and now the airline is responding to accusations of sabotage. that is ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b" today. >> first from fox at 3:00, democrats today winning a major court decision that could have a profound affect on one of the biggest swing states in next month's presidential election. a pennsylvania judge today blocked a tough and controversial new law that would require voters to show valid photo identification. the republican-led state legislature passed the law in march. supporters claim it would prevent fraud and insure t
of the court to say what will law is and that was an expression of his understanding that the power of the judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that wasn't self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction, limits on jurisdiction that somebody has to have a standing at one its jurisdiction. that's another thing the court basically made up. other courts won't necessarily have that. a few years ago to give very interesting kind of judicial trip to south africa which is a fabulous constitution, modern constitution and a wonderful supreme court. the south african constitution gives people all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no limitation on jurisdiction. somebody can come into court and say the constitution promises me a job a
at the boston herald to tell us about the health care law that governor romney shepherded in when he was governor of massachusetts in 2006. and later on, social media and the internet and how they are affecting campaign 2012. we will be right back. ♪d >> ♪ ♪>> ♪ >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. its significance to the story of an uncle tom's cabin is in many ways the story began here. in is in this new number 23 that harriet beecher stowe saw a vision of uncle tonoose being whipped to death. all cocom, as you probably know, is the title character, bureau "uncleher 1853 not vel cabin."ptainm's if anyone in the north or to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. the bill was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. so that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say i'm a christian and i'm against slavery, as was most of new england and it's my right to help a slave to find himself or herself in our borders, we have the right to do that because we're not a slave state an
surveillance by the federal government and they are challenging the law that allows electronic surveillance, this wiretapping because they're concerned that their case will be picked up. they're claiming to have standing to challenge this law because even though the surveillance might be directed overseas to people they're talking to get their dedication will get picked up in the course of that surveillance and so therefore they have the right to challenge it in court. that is the standing issue we we are dealing with. just to get to the merits for a minute, and the aftermath of the exposÉ in the mid-70's about various abuses in the intelligence community and in short in short is set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court surveillance court here in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purpose to give sworn intelligence information. this is way of making sure that the court, there was a court that had to check and had a role in reviewing the government's effort to do this wiretapping which they ended up using in in
of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and communications director. duval patrick is the governor of massachusetts. grover norquist. it's like groundhog day every side -- every five years before us identify our class. we have the only two conservatives the gun and of harvard. the rest of us just throw things at us. it's always amusing commute the series is very good. come back in november bummer doing when it -- william henry harrison. it's a very short program. you don't want to miss that one. and such a presidential merit i visited his tomb. his tomb is in a small town along the ohio river in southeastern ohio commanders as an eternal flame which may have been up for dec
's positions and their plans when it comes to your health. >> since president obama's health care law was enact aed, 3.1 million people under the age of 26 are now covered by their parents' plans and preventive care is covered 100% by insurance companies. seniors, in particular, have benefitted on prescription drugs. >> seniors who fall in the coverage gap known as the doughnut hole will start getting some help. they will receive $250 to help pay for prescriptions and that will, over time, fill in the doughnut hole. >> reporter: 5.5 million seniors have saved a total of nearly $4.5 billion on prescription day since the law was enact aed. that's according to the health and human services department. >> i have strengthened medicare and added years to the life of medicare and we did it by getting rid of taxpayer subsi y subsiddisubsidd subsidies. >> reporter: by 2014 everyone is required to have health insurance. insurers can't deny you if you have a pre-existing condition or reduce your rates. the law planned to expand medicaid to the states with the aim of covering 17 million more people. but t
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
limited. a duty for liberty and right to keep me free and uphold the rule of law to ensure the system if we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud. the government can't keep us safe and it's so limited they should not be telling me that i have to buy health insurance or i will get taxed more. what should the role of government be in your life we are asking you in this morning's journal. it states in the constitution of the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations, the rest are reserved for the state's and the people. next call, jeff in texas. good morning to you, sir. >> caller: that would be kevin in washington. >> host: good morning. you are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: i believe that if the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberties we are supposed to have rules against that, against fraud, against the injured. but the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it seems like they want to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedoms and once you do that, you are violating people's liber
.d. laws specifically target people who are most likely to vote for democrats. since 2011, 34 states introduced laws requiring photo id, and 9 states passed photo id laws. it turns out the only wide spread case come from a republican group. there's also stories of outright voter intimidation taking place. the koch brother funded group true the vote is engaging in a voter suppression effort in the state of ohio. according to the l.a. times, the names selected for purging include hundreds of college students, trailer park residents, homeless people and african-americans in counties president obama won in 2008. tonight the fox affiliate in denver, colorado is reporting the state republican party has terminated its relationship with the same voter registration firm accused of fraud down in the state of florida. it happened after this videotape surfaced of a young woman only registering voters who support mitt romney. >> i am polling people but do you vote for romney or obama? >> i thought you were registering voters a minute ago. >> i am, i am. >> and who are you registering? all voters?
all the decisions about their salaries, benefits, work worlds and they have laws and regulations that govern themselves. and if these politicians don't perform guess what? they throw them out and put their money behind somebody else. these unions will do anything in their power to elect politicians who will serve their interests. they will spend hundreds of millions of dollars, even billions of their members dues on politics. they will send an political and political ground troops which they will include paid volunteers to get out the vote. they will form alliances and donate to leftist organizations who will support a pro-union agenda or go money flows my friends from government employee unions to politicians back to the same unions in a never-ending cycle of greed and corruption. politicians know that union money will cycle back to them in return for their pro-union votes and if they cross those unions, the unions will throw them right out of office. unions reward their friends and punish their enemies very effectively. and the amount of money they can bring to bear as neighbor
should be a very, very limited. judy rights -- to keep me free to uphold the rule of law. to ensure a system of justice if i or we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud, the government cannot keep us safe. what should the role of government be in your life? we are asking you on this friday morning. on twitter -- clearly facing the constitution with the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations. the rest are reserved for the states and the people. next up caller, a republican from texas. good morning. caller: that would be kevin from texas. i believe the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberty. we are supposed to have a rules against fraud, against injury. the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it wants to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedom. once you do that, then you are violating the people's liberty. i think they have gone way too far. there telling us to buy light bulbs, what kind of cars to buy, what kind of insurance to have the. it is ridiculous, it really is. let th
to a suspicious fire at the private law office of vallejo mayor osby davis. christian is live on the building with a look at the damage and the investigation. christian. >> reporter: as you said, fire investigators are already saying this is a suspicious fire. now that the sun is rising we're getting a better look. you can see there's a lot of damage here. looking up you can see this is the office of osby davis. this is his private practice. looking inside the building you can see just how damaging this fire was. officials were inside just a couple of hours ago trying to figure out exactly how this fire started in the first place. crews responded to the fire here at about 1:30 this morning and say when they arrived, there was an intensifier and heavy smoke filling the building. and crews tell me they were able to confine that fire to the waiting room area but also say there's extensive smoke damage throughout the building. mayor0 bee davis was here early earlier this morning as his law office burned, as was michael thompson, the attorney who shares this office space. firefighters say the fire
with environmental laws and despite that loss 10,000 jobs in the last few years. joining us is robert bryce with the manhattan institute and author of power hungry. he is our guy at "varney and company". welcome to the program. point by point. what subsidies does the wind industry get? >> at the federal law will one that is at issue is production tax credit two.two cents per kilowatt hour of electricity produced. it is a lot because in some markets now that subsidy seeks the market price of the electricity being produced by other generators so in some markets in texas the wind energy business is bidding negative prices and paying to put their electricity into the grid so they can collect them in a stuart: tax subsidies for, what our greater than any other form of energy. >> reports i releasing with man had an institute shows the subsidies for the wind industry are at least 12 times what is given to the oil and gas industry on punitive energy produced. stuart: next one. the preferences that they get around environmental laws. >> this just chaps' my hide. [talking over each other] >> i have b
in the united states they have to meet the requirements of many different countries laws, and sometimes it is difficult to become a supplier to a high brand-name a anchor tenant because they don't want to have their brand integrity challenge door product challenge and they are trying to deliver the best product at the best point possible to get more market share and global dominance. so when we talk of a trusted suppliers that one set of suppliers and that's another set of getting into the to process these are both very important. >> dennis was speaking from mississippi in case you couldn't tell from my accent. when you're eating cat fish you don't know if it came from the delta or the vietnam. the food source is truly global but with extending that to deny what you just a little bit further we do have the food and drug administration, the united states department of agriculture regulations, and so to extend your analogy is there a role for regulation in cyberspace? what are the proper roles as melissa mentioned the policy levers to read this is to each of the panelists. >> as i said at
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
university poll out this week asked about the forced ultrasound law passed by republicans in the legislature in virginia this year, signed into law by the republican governor in the state, bob mcdonnell. virginia voters opposed that law by 17 points. the anti-abortion crusade that has been undertaken this year by republican-led state government in virginia is not popular in virginia. and now virginia women are prepared to take it out on the presidency, right? they're planning to vote against the republicans' candidate for president in their state by 18 points. and that was the context for a really important move made by virginia's republican attorney general this week, a move that could be important for the presidential race in virginia. this week the attorney general certified a new set of regulations targeted only at abortion clinics in the united states. these rules are not just for oral surgeons or plastic surgery centers, just targeting abortion providers. it's red tape that is specifically designed to make it economically impossible to operate an abortion clinic in virginia. that's wha
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
. defying the laws of history, we did just that. we gathered the exiles. we store our -- restored our independence and rebuild our life. the jewish people have come home. we will never be uprooted again. [applause] yom kippur.as your income f we have come together on this day of reflection and atonement. we take stock of our past. we pray for our future. we remembered are persecution -- our persecution. we remember the great travails of our dispersion. we mourn the extermination of 6 million people in the holocaust. but at the end of this holiday, we celebrate the birth of israel. we celebrate the terrorism of our young men and women who defended -- heroism of our younn and women who defended israel. in israel, we walk the same paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright
judge that wants to get re-elected and has no bearing in law. the judge is flat out wrong. the united states supreme court has spoken on this back in the year 2000, santa fe v. john doe. you cannot give the impression that a public school is sponsoring prayer or religion. you just can't do it. that's how it is. it's open and shut, black and white. the school is going to shut down and they're not going to be allowed to do that. you want to bring posters in the stands, you can do that. but the students can't lead the charge and that's what's going to be stopped here. >> avery, why do you see this as laughable and what is this hearing all about then? >> well, what's laughable is that you got it exactly right. the amazing thing about this -- >> you're in agreement. >> no, sometimes, richard, you get it right. and he is right. the fact is the law is absolutely clear on this. look, it's a local state judge. you have to know east texas. this is not austin, this is the beaumont area and i understand. there is no constitutional way a judge can stop the school district from barring these signs.
are ineffectual policies like the president's healthcare law and stimulus packages, but the cost of those policies as compared to romney's own perscriptions that call for smaller less expensive government. for the president what he's going to try to do is say look, maybe things aren't so great but it is partly the fault of george w. bush and the republicans who were in office prior to the democrats taking control in 2009, so we need time to fix it, and by the way, the president will also say that he wants to increase taxes on people like mitt romney to help pay down some of that debt. >> reporter: we just put of that graphic there showing the $16 trillion of debt and there are so many digits it almost doesn't fit on the tv screen across the screen there, as you can see. but haven't americans in some way become number to astronomical numbers? how serious is this in. >> they have become number. is it the new normal this massive spilling of red ink but it raises three problems which i don't think the nation has got even to grips with yet. number one our economy is smaller than our debt. we look like
napolitano says the law being drafted is not the sum all one might hope for. [applause] >> well, thank you, and good morning. happy friday to everybody. happy friday. yes, there you go. i want to thank national journal and government executive for inviting me to this year's cyber security summit because i can think of no more important or urgent topic in today's interconnected world. the cyber domain is woven into the fabric of our daily lives. while this increase connectivity has led to significant transformation and advances across our country and, indeed, around the world, it also has increased the importance and complexity of our shared risk. the flip side of all the good that comes from the internet is that cyber attacks have increased significantly over the past decade. indeed, they have increased significantly in the nearly four years that i have served as the secretary of homeland security. here is a quick sense of scale -- just last year, our u.s. computer emergency team, which provides defense against cyber attacks for the federal civilian part of the government as well as privat
. one of the first laws passed by the first congress back then. whether the defendant may be liable under those violations. a territory of a foreign sovereign. this is very important human right case that will determine whether or not victims of human right abuses can sue corporations in the united states for violations of the billion tort statute of 1789. the question -- it is no question if an billion, like an ambassador gets assaulted by an american citizen, this statute would apply. now justices are being asked if it should be much more expensive and evolving human right cases and foreign companies where there is no particular u.s. nexus. the justice has sounded skeptical of broadening this law, the application of this loss in these kind of cases. connell: peter barnes, thank you very much. dagen: you want even more on the supreme court. we have judge andrew napolitano talking with us about protecting the information on your cell phone. connell: that is coming up a little bit later on in the hour. one of the big name banks got a big write up over the weekend. we will tell you mo
one can stop you. no one could stop me." that is, except the law. when police arrested him five months ago in jalalabad during the planning of the attack. he's now awaiting trial. proudly a member of the taliban, he says no one encouraged him to do this. "look at our situation. the foreigners kill our people. insult our religion. burning the holy koran and making cartoons of our prophet mohammed. if we don't defend islam, then we are not muslim." suicide bombings and other attacks are now daily currencies in the war in afghanistan. and the methods of the insurgents are constantly changing, according to the prison boss, general muhammad khan. "the enemy don't use their own tactics. now they use women. sometimes children and teenagers. they even get dressed up in military uniforms. they don't fight face to face. they're coward." the taliban denies recruiting children as suicide bombers. the facts tell a very different story. authorities say just a few days ago a 10-year-old orphan boy managed to escape from insurgents who were going to make him wear a suicide vest so he could blow himsel
in the nation that has done this for kids and for teenagers. governor jerry brown signed this ban in into law over this past weekend and tweeted about it. let me read one of his tweets. this bill bans nonscientific, quote, therapies that have driven young people to depression and suicide. joining me is david pickup, a reparative therapist and spokesman for the national association of research and therapy of homosexuality, he is getting miked up. also with me right now is cnn's senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. so, elizabeth, as we await david, just begin with what we know about this so-called reparative therapy. >> the american psychological association had a task force that took a long look at this. and here's what they came up with. they said there is no good studies showing it works or doesn't work. so no good studies showing this works. they say some people have been harmed by it, depression, other problems. and this is a quote, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of psychological interventions to change sexual orientation. >> okay. >> plainly spoken. >> hold tha
're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a terror attack. our reporting also reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is go
reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not. today the director of national intelligence, james clapper, explained early evidence supported that theory, so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection in other words, but that request was not granted. fran is a former white
. so go to legalzoom.com today and see for yourself. it's law that just makes sense. >> signs of life in the housing market. joining us is tony with keen investments realty. three homes to show us. >> yes. stuart: former prices, current prices, price movement. let's start with colorado. a picture, i think. this house built in the year 2000, listed in '07 for 1.75 million dollars. sank to 975. now is at 1.1 million. is that accurate? >> it's accurate and we're getting a the lot of activity on that house, it's a great rental, if only for the summer, right? and you get fishing rights with it. it's need, but colorado is an interesting state. they have jobs. the manpower employment survey said that 17% of companies in denver, now, this house isn't in denver obviously, but plan to hire and 73% continue to maintain their stats. >> the local jobs market markets strength in the housing market. went to 975 bottom. bounced to 1.1. a bounce in real estate in colorado. item two, atlanta. a house a year ago listed for 298, october much 11. 298 now at 300,000, not much of a bounce, but it's a bounce
? [ female announcer ] wells fargo. together we'll go far. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> welcome back to "early start." i'm john berman. >> and i'm zoraida sambolin. sometime today president obama and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu plan to speak by phone. may not be pleasant because the two leaders cannot seem to get on the same page when it comes to the threat of a nuclear iran. >> netanyahu has been calling on the president to get tough with the iranians to draw a red line. now, that hasn't happened so the israeli prime minister pulled out a couple of props at the united nations general assembly yesterday and drew his own red line. >> where should a red line be drawn? a red line should be drawn right he here. before, before iran completes the second stage of nuclear enrichment. necessary to make a bo
sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a terror attack. our reporting also reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothly, the fbi has hit a bump in the road to the crime scene and tonight, we've got reporting that could explain why that is. a senior law enforcement official telling fran townsend the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection, in other words, but that request was not granted. fran's a former white house homeland security advisor. she served in the george w. bush administration, currently she sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews and forbes. also joining us, former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes, who has extensive experience investigating attacks on americans overseas, and former cia officer, bob baer. so fran, so the fbi sought military protection to go into benghazi. why didn't they get it? >> well, the answer to that question, i think, is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you w
was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection in other words, but that request was not granted. fran is a former white house homeland security adviser, serbed in the george w. bush administration. sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with mcandrews & forbes. and former fbi assistant director tom pointes who has extensive experience in investigating attacks overseas. so there was military protection to go into benghazi, why didn't they get it? >> the answer to the question is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to prode it, we don't know what the ans
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 139 (some duplicates have been removed)